Centex Blog

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COVID-19

COVID Treatment

But, What if I Catch COVID?

In the process of finding normality and adjustments during these unprecedented times, one might question whether or not we are actually contributing to slowing the spread of this virus as we continue to follow CDC guidelines. While the country continues to execute plans to offer the vaccine to the entire population, let’s elaborate on what progress has been made in terms of treatment options for patients who catch COVID-19.  

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Getting access to a COVID vaccine

COVID Vaccines and What to do in the Meantime

COVID-19 has proven to be one of the deadliest viruses in recorded history. It’s no surprise that people are lining the streets and entering months-long waiting lists to get their vaccines. In a previous blog, we discussed What’s Going on with COVID Vaccines and why we need to continue doing research. Today we will be elaborating on that by discussing who will actually have access to the EUA vaccines and what everyone else should be doing in the meantime. Keep reading to learn how you could get early access to a vaccine candidate.

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What's Going on with the COVID Vaccine

What's Going on with COVID Vaccines?

We’re finally wrapping up 2020, but with a new year comes new research, especially COVID-19 research. There seems to be a lot of confusion around the COVID vaccine candidates and why we would need to continue researching if certain candidates are already approved. Well, we’re here to set the record straight!

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Holidays and COVID-19

Holiday Season During the Pandemic

2020 has got to go down in history as one of the craziest years recorded. From natural disasters to presidential elections and worldwide pandemics to rumors of wars, times are uncertain, to say the least. Now, the holiday season is coming up, and COVID-19 has never been worse. So, what does this mean for us? Keep reading as we discuss what to expect on the corona-front this holiday season.

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Managing Mental Health During COVID-19

Mental illness is a significant issue here in the US. Research shows that just under 20% of adults experience some form of mental illness in an average year.[1] Now with almost a year of the coronavirus under our belt, the rates continue to rise. According to a poll conducted in mid-July, 53% of Americans reported their mental health had been negatively affected by the virus. Many expressed “difficulty sleeping or eating, increases in alcohol consumption or substance use, and worsening chronic conditions, due to worry and stress over the coronavirus.[2]

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How COVID-19 Changed the World

There isn't one person in the entire world that has not been affected by COVID-19 in one way or another. This worldwide pandemic has turned our lives upside-down, side-ways, and back again in just half a year. It has shaken us to our very core, and some things have changed, possibly, forever. Things like our workforce, education system, and even the clinical research industry may never be the same. Keep reading to learn more.

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COVID

What Will a Vaccine Really do for COVID-19?

Is it just us, or is just about everything on the news these days about COVID-19, or more specifically, a vaccine for preventing COVID-19? With all of this coverage, it may get you thinking, "what will a vaccine REALLY do for this world-wide pandemic?" Look no further as we discuss not only what a vaccine will do, but also how this could look in the future, and how far away we are from actually getting there.

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Why is COVID Research Important

Why is COVID Research Important?

There are many types of coronaviruses that affect humans. In 2019, a new coronavirus discovered in Wuhan, China, would evolve into the pandemic we know as COVID-19. Although most people affected by COVID-19 experience mild to moderate respiratory illness, over 470,000 have lost their lives worldwide to date from it. Now, after months of social distancing and each state in different reopening phases, COVID-19 research is the key to getting back to normal.

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